Phát âm chuẩn cùng VOA – Anh ngữ đặc biệt: The Hungriest Places on Earth (VOA)

Published on 10/02/2015

Học tiếng Anh hiệu quả, nhanh chóng: http://www.facebook.com/HocTiengAnhVOA, http://www.voatiengviet.com/section/hoc-tieng-anh/2693.html. Nếu không vào được VOA, xin hãy vào http://vn3000.com để vượt tường lửa. Các chương trình học tiếng Anh miễn phí của VOA (VOA Learning English for Vietnamese) có thể giúp bạn cải tiến kỹ năng nghe và phát âm, hiểu rõ cấu trúc ngữ pháp, và sử dụng Anh ngữ một cách chính xác. Xem thêm: http://www.facebook.com/VOATiengViet

Luyện nghe nói và học từ vựng tiếng Anh qua video. Xem các bài học kế tiếp: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLD7C5CB40C5FF0531

Ag: Luyện nghe nói tiếng Anh qua video: Chương trình học tiếng Anh của VOA: Special English Agriculture Report. Xin hãy vào http://www.voatiengviet.com/section/hoc-tieng-anh/2693.html để xem các bài kế tiếp.

A recent study says Burundi is the hungriest place on Earth. Each year the International Food Policy Research Institute releases a Global Hunger Index report. The 2014 report showed the highest areas of hunger are in Africa, south of the Sahara. The report describes Burundi and Eritrea as areas with high levels of hunger. Poverty, more than 10 years of war and overpopulation, have strongly affected Burundi’s economic and food security. Continuing demand for limited resources has created serious problems for the country. Along many of the hillsides in Burundi’s northern Ngozi province, workers are digging and planting. They hope to stop fertile soils from sliding away. The United Nations World Food Program is currently paying more than 5,700 local farmers to work other people’s lands. The WFP program, Food-for-Assets, comes after years of local farmers trying and failing to beat hunger by working their own land. Fifty-year-old Matthias Bukuru is one of the farmers. He says that the $1.25 wage he earns is a large amount compared what he used to earn. He describes his former farming life as “self-enforced slavery.” He made just 12 cents a day, and he and his family went hungry. The Burundian civil war ended in 2005 after twelve years of fighting. The conflict left much fertile land untended. The World Food Program says recent studies show that feeding and agricultural programs have reduced malnutrition rates nationwide from 58 to 49 percent. The WFP says Burundi’s government wants to wipe out hunger in the country.

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