Phát âm chuẩn cùng VOA – Anh ngữ đặc biệt: Screams Have Special Place in Brain (VOA)

Published on 23/10/2015

Học tiếng Anh hiệu quả, nhanh chóng: http://www.facebook.com/HocTiengAnhVOA, http://www.voatiengviet.com/section/hoc-tieng-anh/2693.html. Nếu không vào được VOA, xin hãy vào http://vn3000.com để vượt tường lửa. Các chương trình học tiếng Anh miễn phí của VOA (VOA Learning English for Vietnamese) có thể giúp bạn cải tiến kỹ năng nghe và phát âm, hiểu rõ cấu trúc ngữ pháp, và sử dụng Anh ngữ một cách chính xác. Xem thêm: http://www.facebook.com/VOATiengViet

Luyện nghe nói và học từ vựng tiếng Anh qua video. Xem các bài học kế tiếp: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLD7C5CB40C5FF0531

Econ: Luyện nghe nói tiếng Anh qua video: Chương trình học tiếng Anh của VOA: Special English Economics Report. Xin hãy vào http://www.voatiengviet.com/section/hoc-tieng-anh/2693.html để xem các bài kế tiếp.

Health: Luyện nghe nói tiếng Anh qua video: Chương trình học tiếng Anh của VOA: Special English Health Report. Xin hãy vào http://www.voatiengviet.com/section/hoc-tieng-anh/2693.html để xem các bài kế tiếp.

When people hear a scream they usually respond quickly. But why are screams so useful in warning us of danger? New research helps to explain why screaming is disturbing…and useful. People of all cultures and languages hear the same thing in a scream: fear. David Poeppel is a neuroscientist at New York University. He wondered why screams are recognized in the same way by people all around the world. He and his colleagues recorded screams from movies and from volunteers. The scientists, however, did not measure the screams only for loudness or sound. Instead, they measured how quickly the sounds in the scream changed in volume. The researchers found that screams are different from other kinds of sounds we hear. Sounds are described in terms of their frequency. Frequency is measured in hertz (Hz). Normal speech changes in volume at a low rate – about 4 to 5 Hertz or cycles per second. Screams, however, change in volume very quickly and very widely — from 30 Hertz up to 150 Hertz. When the volume of a sound changes that quickly, it has a quality called “roughness.” The more roughness a sound has, the more worrying it is. The researchers found that the greater “roughness” of a sound, the more it activates the amygdala. The amygdala is an area deep in the brain that answers to fear. Screams, it turns out, are a direct link to the part of our brain that tells us if we should be afraid, or not.

Enjoyed this video?
"No Thanks. Please Close This Box!"