Phát âm chuẩn cùng VOA – Anh ngữ đặc biệt: Big Farm Little Farm (VOA)

Published on 20/08/2013

Phương pháp học tiếng Anh hiệu quả, nhanh chóng: Các chương trình học tiếng Anh của Ban Việt ngữ VOA (VOA Learning English for Vietnamese) có thể giúp các bạn cải tiến kỹ năng nghe, hiểu rõ cấu trúc và ngữ pháp, và sử dụng Anh ngữ một cách chính xác.

Luyện nghe nói tiếng Anh qua video: Chương trình học tiếng Anh của VOA: Special English Agriculture Report. Xin hãy vào http://www.voatiengviet.com/section/hoc-tieng-anh/2693.html để xem các bài kế tiếp.

From VOA Learning English, this is the Agriculture Report.

Demand for meat, milk and eggs is growing around the world. To meet that demand, the way these products are produced is changing. The change is from small farms to large, industrial operations. This has already happened in the United States. But not everyone is happy with the change. As a result, there is also a growing demand for products grown locally on small farms. The government says the efficiency of large-scale production in a controlled environment has helped reduce the price of a pork chop, for example, by nearly 20 percent since 1998. Efficient and intensive production methods are being used around the world. Many experts say that is a good thing as the demand for meat grows while supplies of land, water and feed are limited. But the results of efficiency are not always good. The waste from thousands of confined animals can pollute waterways and produce greenhouse gases. And some health experts are concerned about the antibiotics and other chemicals being put in the animals’ feed. Others criticize the conditions in which the animals are kept.

So today, a growing number of people are like Kevin Summers in Amissville, Virginia, and returning to small-scale farming. More Americans today say they want to know where their food comes from. Some might like the way Kevin Summers raises his hogs. He says his hogs live a good life under humane conditions. Food waste is reduced by feeding them damaged apples and old pumpkins. This kind of farming means higher prices. But Kevin Summers says he believes it is still possible to meet global demand this way. He says it would involve people making the choice to buy this kind of food and care about something other than just the cost.

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