Phát âm chuẩn – Anh ngữ đặc biệt: Eating Noises (VOA)

Published on 13/05/2016

Học tiếng Anh hiệu quả, nhanh chóng: http://www.facebook.com/HocTiengAnhVOA, http://www.voatiengviet.com/section/hoc-tieng-anh/2693.html. Nếu không vào được VOA, xin hãy vào http://vn3000.com để vượt tường lửa. Các chương trình học tiếng Anh miễn phí của VOA (VOA Learning English for Vietnamese) có thể giúp bạn cải tiến kỹ năng nghe và phát âm, hiểu rõ cấu trúc ngữ pháp, và sử dụng Anh ngữ một cách chính xác. Xem thêm: http://www.facebook.com/VOATiengViet

Luyện nghe nói và học từ vựng tiếng Anh qua video. Xem các bài học kế tiếp: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLD7C5CB40C5FF0531

It is sometimes said that humans eat with all of their senses. We see food before us, then our senses of smell, touch and taste help us enjoy it. But can our sense of hearing affect how we eat? A new report says that it can. That comes from researchers at Brigham Young and Colorado State Universities in the United States. They found that hearing is an important sense in the eating experience. Hearing is often called “the forgotten food sense,” says Ryan Elder. Elder is an assistant professor of marketing at Brigham Young University’s Marriott School of Management. For the study, the researchers wanted to test whether the sounds of eating had any effect on how much a person ate. During the experiments, the subjects wore headphones and listened to noise at either a high or a low level. Then researchers gave them a solid snack to eat. The study found that subjects who listened to the higher noise level ate more food than those listening to the lower noise level. Elder says that when hiding the sounds of your food, like when you watch TV or listen to loud music, it takes away the sense of hearing the food in your mouth. And this may cause you to eat more than you normally would. The researchers say that hearing the noises of your food as you eat could help you to be more mindful of the eating experience. This may help you enjoy it more. The researchers reported their findings in the Food Quality and Preference journal.

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