Phát âm chuẩn cùng VOA – Anh ngữ đặc biệt: Trends in U.S. Farming (VOA-Ag)

Published on 26/05/2014

Phương pháp học tiếng Anh hiệu quả, nhanh chóng: Các chương trình học tiếng Anh của Ban Việt ngữ VOA (VOA Learning English for Vietnamese) có thể giúp các bạn cải tiến kỹ năng nghe, hiểu rõ cấu trúc và ngữ pháp, và sử dụng Anh ngữ một cách chính xác.

Học tiếng Anh: http://www.facebook.com/Words.and.Idioms hiệu quả, nhanh chóng. Các chương trình của VOA Learning English for Vietnamese (http://www.voatiengviet.com/section/hoc-tieng-anh/2693.html) có thể giúp các bạn cải tiến kỹ năng nghe, hiểu rõ cấu trúc và ngữ pháp, và sử dụng Anh ngữ một cách chính xác.

Ag: Luyện nghe nói tiếng Anh qua video: Chương trình học tiếng Anh của VOA: Special English Agriculture Report. Xin hãy vào http://www.voatiengviet.com/section/hoc-tieng-anh/2693.html để xem các bài kế tiếp.

Have you ever wondered what the average American farmer looks like? A new report says he is a 58-year-old white man. That information comes from the United States Census Bureau, an agency that collects and studies information about the nation’s population and economy. The report says farmers who are 65 and older are the fastest growing group of farm operators. As these farmers retire, American agriculture will experience big changes. The report suggests what some of those changes might look like. Adrienne Gibson works a small piece of land north of Knoxville, Tennessee. In some ways, she is something of a new face in American agriculture. First, she is a woman. And second, she is a minority. And she is succeeding in an industry controlled mostly by white men. But the Census Bureau report suggests that may be changing. The number of minority farmers working American soil is growing. The report also suggests that U.S. farms are getting smaller. Nate Phillips teaches farming at Middle Tennessee State University. He says smaller farms are partly a reaction to changes in the way Americans think about their food. This movement is often called farm-to-table. It means that more Americans are starting to buy food that is grown locally. And they want to know exactly where their food is coming from. Nate Phillips notes that more young people are farming because of this trend. There is another trend that is sure to please American farmers. The Census Bureau found that the value of the food farmers produce rose more than 25 percent in just six years.

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