Phát âm chuẩn cùng VOA – Anh ngữ đặc biệt: Sweet Potatoes as Medicine (VOA)

Published on 19/09/2015

Học tiếng Anh hiệu quả, nhanh chóng: http://www.facebook.com/HocTiengAnhVOA, http://www.voatiengviet.com/section/hoc-tieng-anh/2693.html. Nếu không vào được VOA, xin hãy vào http://vn3000.com để vượt tường lửa. Các chương trình học tiếng Anh miễn phí của VOA (VOA Learning English for Vietnamese) có thể giúp bạn cải tiến kỹ năng nghe và phát âm, hiểu rõ cấu trúc ngữ pháp, và sử dụng Anh ngữ một cách chính xác. Xem thêm: http://www.facebook.com/VOATiengViet

Luyện nghe nói và học từ vựng tiếng Anh qua video. Xem các bài học kế tiếp: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLD7C5CB40C5FF0531

From VOA Learning English, this is the Health Report. HarvestPlus is an agricultural research organization. It is teaching people how to grow so-called “smart” crops. Its project in Mozambique is having surprising effects. In 2006, HarvestPlus workers provided orange sweet potato plants to people in 24 Mozambique villages. The workers taught people how to grow the vegetables. They also explained the importance of Vitamin A. Farmers in Mozambique had been planting white and yellow sweet potatoes, not the orange-colored ones. The white and yellow potatoes have very little Vitamin A. However, one small orange sweet potato has a full day’s supply of Vitamin A. Vitamin A is important for healthy eyesight and helps the body fight infections. The World Health Organization says 190 million young children around the world are not getting enough of Vitamin A in the foods they eat. Economist Alan de Brauw is with the International Food Policy Research Institute. He talked about the HarvestPlus project. He says about 70 percent of children in Mozambique were not getting enough Vitamin A. Mr. de Brauw says the potatoes had a surprising effect on children’s health. At the end of three-years, the researchers compared the health of children in villages growing orange sweet potatoes to those not growing them. Children living in the sweet potato villages had 40 percent fewer cases of diarrhea than other boys and girls. Under the age of three, the difference was 50 percent. Experts say teaching farmers how to grow healthier food is among the best ways to improve health.

Enjoyed this video?
"No Thanks. Please Close This Box!"