Phát âm chuẩn – Anh ngữ đặc biệt: Low Levels of Vitamin D Might Hurt Brain (VOA)

Published on 11/12/2015

Học tiếng Anh hiệu quả, nhanh chóng: http://www.facebook.com/HocTiengAnhVOA, http://www.voatiengviet.com/section/hoc-tieng-anh/2693.html. Nếu không vào được VOA, xin hãy vào http://vn3000.com để vượt tường lửa. Các chương trình học tiếng Anh miễn phí của VOA (VOA Learning English for Vietnamese) có thể giúp bạn cải tiến kỹ năng nghe và phát âm, hiểu rõ cấu trúc ngữ pháp, và sử dụng Anh ngữ một cách chính xác. Xem thêm: http://www.facebook.com/VOATiengViet

Luyện nghe nói và học từ vựng tiếng Anh qua video. Xem các bài học kế tiếp: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLD7C5CB40C5FF0531

Health: Luyện nghe nói tiếng Anh qua video: Chương trình học tiếng Anh của VOA: Special English Health Report. Xin hãy vào http://www.voatiengviet.com/section/hoc-tieng-anh/2693.html để xem các bài kế tiếp.

Vitamin D is important for healthy bones and teeth. It may also help to protect the body against diseases such as diabetes and cancer. Now, researchers say Vitamin D might help fight brain diseases called dementias. Dementias damage thinking and memory processes, what scientists call “cognitive abilities.” Dementias are difficult to treat. And the disease is very frightening to those who have it. More than 47 million people around the world suffer from dementia. The World Health Organization reports that 60 percent of them live in low- and middle-income countries. Now a new study in the United States shows a possible link between dementia and low levels of vitamin D. Researchers at Rutgers University in New Jersey are exploring the relationship between vitamin D and dementia. The team recently measured vitamin D levels and cognitive ability in older people. Nutritional sciences professor Joshua Miller led the team. He said cognitive abilities differed among the subjects studied. He said tests showed that about 60 percent of the group was low in vitamin D. Those subjects who had low vitamin D levels showed more short-term memory loss. They also were less able to organize thoughts, order tasks by importance and make decisions. The findings suggest that vitamin D might play a part in slowing dementia. More studies, however, are needed to see if vitamin D supplements can help. The research was published in JAMA Neurology.

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